1816 Farmington
Quaker Meetinghouse

A National Center for Equal Rights

1816 Farmington
Quaker Meetinghouse

A National Center for Equal Rights

Our Mission

The 1816 Farmington Quaker Meetinghouse Museum preserves and interprets the 1816 Meetinghouse as a national site of conscience and a cornerstone of historic movements for equal rights, social justice, and peace, including rights for Native Americans, African Americans, and women, encouraging visitors to explore equality, justice and peace in their own lives.

Equal Rights For All

Farmington was linked to the Underground Railroad and major Black leaders in the national movement to abolish slavery.

Seneca people met in the 1816 Farmington Quaker Meetinghouse with Quaker allies to organize resistance to loss of their lands in the 1838 Treaty of Buffalo Creek.

Quakers helped organize the Seneca Falls women’s rights convention in 1848 and at least one-quarter of the signers of the Declaration of Sentiments were affiliated with Farmington Friends.

News

We remember with gratitude and humility that the 1816 Farmington Quaker Meetinghouse stands on traditional homelands of Seneca (Onondowagah) people, keepers of the western door of the Haudenosaunee (Hodinohso:ni) Confederacy. We are honored to work with Seneca people today to help create a world of respect and care for the earth and all living beings.